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作者:Mckay

AG永久入口💰【ag88.shop】💰澳门凯时官网Te/xt s】iz/e】AaAa】Just ye【s【t】erday it was annou\nced t\ha【t/ 170 global news \ou\tlets have signed up for th//e week-\】lon/g &lsquo/;Covering Cli】ma\te Now\&\rsq】uo; pledg】e, starting from】 16【th Septe】mber.In an attempt to boo\st the media’s coverage of the cl/imate crisis, \US-based /Columbia Journalism Rev【【iew (CJR) came up with the 'Cov\【ering Climate Now' init\】i/ative /back in M/a】y, alo\ngside /progressive m/aga【\zine The【【 Nation. Participatin】g outl【\ets are expe】cted to partake in a week dedicat【ed to spr】eading a\war【eness around the climate crisis, through repor【ti/ng 】on uniquely environm】ental iss】【ue/s.The pledge w\as announced following an 【article, co-written b】y t\】he【 respective /e/ditors o【f the two/ \publi】catio【ns, on the C】JR, entitled &ls/quo;The media are compla【】cent while the】 w/orld burns&r/squ\o;. A long re】ad at \【over 5,【000 words/, the detailed pi/ece addr【esses/ the【 &l【dquo】;climate silenc\【e】” that pervades the bulk of the news &ldquo\;when civili】zation is ac/celerating toward disas】ter.&】rdquo; View this po\st【 on Instagram/O/ver/ 170 n【ews outlets f\rom around 】the wo】rld 】have now signed up \f\or Co】vering Climate N\ow, a pr/\oj/\ect co-founded by CJR and The /Nation aimed at stren【g【thening】 the media’s focus on 】the climate crisi【s. 】Click the link in our bio t】o \learn about our proje\ct. #\c【limatechan/ge【 #oureart/hproject #organic #sustainability #e【co【 #earth #ecostyle #gogreen #nature】 #globalwarming #blue #mountain #be【autiful #【No】pollut】ion #】pico【ftheday #coveringclimatenow\A pos\t shared by Colum\bia Journalism R\e\view (@columbiajourn\a】lism\review) o【n Aug 28/,】 201【9 at/】 12:02pm PDTNow that th【e initiative h/as come into full 【f/【orce, 170 out\lets ha【ve jumped on the b】andw\【ago】n, agreeing t【o a week of ‘Co\v\er\ing Cli/mate \Now’. The coverage be\gins on 16th\ Sept\ember and will deliber【/ately coincide w\ith th/e United Nations Cli】mate Action S【ummit i】n N\ew York on 23rd Sep】tember/, whi】ch will culminate】 t】he week.【 】A【t the summit,【 global government【s will lay ou】】t exactly 【【how they plan 【to me/et the Par\is Agr\eement to combat climate change. The central】【 a/im of th\is agreement 【is to work together t\o /keep th/e 【global temperature “w\ell belo\w” 2 degree】s Ce\】lsius above pre-indust/ri\al levels.T/he 170 participa【nts ra】【nge from wire【 service】s to /newspapers, magazines,】 educationa】l institutions, \【】TV a\nd radi】o channels and even】 independent journalists. National public /【【TV broadc\asters in\ Italy, Sweden/ and the Un/】it】\ed States will be invo\【lved, as well as scholarly journa【/【ls such as the Harvard Business R【eview.Many of/ the outlets【/】 partak【】】i\ng ar【e\ g/lobally renowned, such as Bloomberg, CB】/S News\, The Guardian, \/Vice Media and Busi】ness】 Green,\ and incl/ude independen】t j/ou/【rnalists such as Benj\amin【 Ryan from The New York Times and Alex Thomson f\or 【Ch/annel 4 News.Mark Hertsgaard【, /a\uthor \and environment co】rrespondent f\or The Nation magaz\ine, \wh/o is helping to organize 'Cov【ering Climate Now',【 told Euronews Living about his inspiration be【hind 】starting the cam】paign.“I’ve/ been co/ver【ing climate change since 1/989, rep/orting from/ 25 countries/ around the【 world\/ a】n】d much /of】 the Un\ited\ States,\ and it 【has long be】en clear that most news outle/ts have underplayed 【if n/ot outright ignored the】 en【ormous imp】orta\n/ce of the climate story."H【ertsgaard went on to emphasise that the m/edia sector m】ust【 "tra【/nsform", citing the impetus for 'Covering /Climate/ No【w' as the UN /Inte\rgovern】mental Panel 】on Climate Cha】nge's landmark 1.5 C report last October/.I【s o\n/e week of environmental coverag\e enough?For many climate /change activis】ts, s】imply o】ne week of coverage may not \suffic】e, given the gr】ave /en【vironmental adversity we are facing a】s a \planet.Zio/n Lights, a national spo\kes【person for Extinction Rebe/llion UK, \【told \【Eu\ronews Living that 【the crisis we are 】facing is "bigger than any w\ar.""Although it's g】】ood t】o hear \that the】 media will be/ giv\ing this increased coverage to】】 the climate a】nd eco/logi】/c】al c【risis, it's still simply not enough to address t【he】 situation we ar【e in. It's importan】t that more journalists wa】【ke up to the realit】y of /this cris【is【, whi】ch 【req】uires f\ocused a/nd continuou【s reporting【, simil【ar】 to war time coverage since what we are facing 】is bi】gger than/ any war."Cli\mate chan【ge protestor【sSh\e co】nclu\ded by saying, "a week is nowhere /ne】【\ar enough time to tackle the crisis we a】re in."Morten】 Thysen, a【 Clim/ate Cam\paigner for Greenpe\ace U】K】, /also】 told Euronews Living that\ this is "good news, abo【ut very/ bad news."“Most of the 【news media has rigorousl\y】 ignored】 【th【/e climate crisis fo】r【 three\ decades, and so it’s encou】rag/ing that th【ese outlets are tryin【g a d/ifferent tac【/k. Hopef/ully this period of intensive coverage will \crea\te dee】per/ un\dersta【ndin\g /an【d engagement w【hic\h lasts longer than the week in questi\on.”Share t】his article 】 【【【 Mor】e from life】Javi\er Bar\dem t【akes over Times Square\ 【to demand ocean protections/“The lo\nge/r the sup】ply 】chain, the m/ore 【is【 wasted/”Text si【zeAaA\aHaving cricket tacos or fried Man\churia/n scorpi/ons on the menu of your favourit【e organic and susta【in【able resta\/【urant ha/s a pr】etty good 】chan【ce in 】the futu【re.【 E【dible insects are on/ the/ r\i】se, t【hey are becomin】g more and more popular f【or nu【tri】tion】a】l/ reasons\ and f/or environmen/tal b/enefits./\According to a r】e/port of Global Market Insights,【 the global edible\ i【ns】ects market s/\ize is /expect】ed to grow f/r【om o/ve【r $】55 mi【llion in 27 to】 over 0 million by 2024.In 】the We【stern part of the】 wo】rld, the gastronomic argument is on the go wh】ile many】 hig】h-e】n】d r】estaurants joine】d it alr\eady, such as the multiple winner of the Wo】rld’s B【est Restaurant, Noma】 in Copenhagen, which h】ad become widel】y kno/wn for its efforts to make】】 in【sects as an acc】eptable food】 fo【r th\e futu\re. Another temple of hi【gh-en/d g】astronomy, S&atil】de;o Paulo&rsqu/o;s D.O.M., ranked the ninth best re/staurant in】 the】 】world】, made headlines a fe/w years ago by s】erving a r\aw/ Amazo\nian leaf-c/utter ant on a pi\\neapple cube.In an era in which】 concern o\ver the world'【s climate only c\ontinues to grow deep【er/, experts 】are re】g【ularly encouraging extreme and pe】rhaps even creative action. Hence advocates of/ edible in/sects ar\e singing the/ en/vironmental】 benefits of s\prinkli【ng your di】she【s 】【with crickets, grasshopp\ers and ant【s】.B】ugs p【ack a lot of protein and minerals but take 【far f\/ewer reso】urces /to produce than animal meat/.Click on the vi\deo above 】to learn more abou\t 】the\ high-end ins】ect dishes 【serv/ed in New York City/.S】ha】r\e\ this 】\article / \ More from wellnessThe climat【e em】erg】e/ncy is 】no】t th/e【 only\ en【viron\】me【ntal issu\e th\e world【 i】s strug\/\gli】ng to solve. Plastic \products clog our ocean/s, /thre】atening /marine /life and poll【uting the water. At current rates plastic】 is predicted to outweigh all the f\ish in t/h】e sea by the \year 2050. In Holla/nd, a new device 【is a sm\all si】gn of 】hope.】 \'WasteSha/【rk' is a remotely /contro\lled device that 】co【llects rubbish 】from the water.Th】is m/ini-catamaran has been developed to remo【ve plastics and ot/h【er fl】oating debris from\ 【the sur\face of l【akes a【nd oceans/. Its sensors c【an moni/【tor pol】luti【on】 le\【v【el/】s a【n】d】 other environmental ind/icators. It 】is e/lectrically powered, emissio/n-free a】nd can collect hundreds of \kilos o\f rubbish at a /time. Ric/hard Hardiman is the \founder of Ranmarine Technologies, the comp\any responsible fo【r Waste Shark:"What【 we're tryi】/ng to do is cre/\ate a small enough vesse】l that will g【et into tight spac\es where wa/ste c】ol】lects, particularly in the harbours and the port【s,\ and s【top all that waste being take/n out in】to the grea/】ter ocean."I have】 a visio】n in 【my head that /keeps me 】going, that is】 you'd be sit\ting in a/ control room from our\ site 】we could se\e where /eve【ry drone is across/ the p】lane【t, how many\ \are o【perating, how much wast/e is being ca】ught and actually see the real im【pac\t of that these things are\ making a\round the world."\T/his is one of the 】proje\cts that receive/d su】pport from th】】e European funds allocated to】 making plas【t】ic circular. R【anmari/ne 【/is a\ Dutch startup \company and has already g\ot 【cust/o】m/ers】 in several countries. Tessa Despinic is its design en\gineer:"The basi\c function of /t/he】 WasteShark is very simple.【 【It just swims aroun】d and collects tra/sh f/rom the su/rface. 【But inside, it's always chan】ging, we're always try/ing to make 【it light【er, more efficie】nt/, easier to do mainten/a\nce on. And we【're also buil】ding \an autonomous v/ersion that w/ill s】wim a】round accord【ing\ to/ w【】aypoints /that y\ou give】【 it. So we're alw【ays wo/rking o\n that 【and /making】 it better/."Th/e Eu/ropean Union is l】eading the global fight against marine lit】ter. Besides its/ policies curbing single\-us\e plas/】tic【s and r\ed\ucing waste from l/ost\ fishing gear/, the EU ha】s earmarked 】350/ million Euro \【for research a\n/d de】velopment in this area.Watch Good /M/orni【n】g E\urope's report i\n the player\ ab/ove.J\ournalist/ \na\me • Joao Vitor【 Da Silva MarquesVideo editor • Joa】o Vitor Da Silva Marques】/Sha】re this \art\icleCopy/pas\te t/he a\rt/icle\ vi】deo embed link below:CopyShareTwe\etSharesendS/hareTw】ee】tSha\resen】dMoreHide/S【har/eSendShareShar\eShareSen【dS/hareSh【areYou might also like \ 】 C【OP25: C\hile summit/ withdrawa\l /hits tourism \b】/【u【t \opens new door fo\r environment\ a\ctivists / 】 /\ \ 【 / Is Blac/k Friday bad for/ the environment? Activists take on\ 【sh/opping【 fr【enzy 】 】 / C【ol】dplay to /pause touring, cit【ing environmental reasons / More aboutclima【te】 chang\ecli【】】】mate protectio/nClimate emergen【cyClim/a\te crisisEnvironm\ent polluti/onEn/vironmental】【】 protectionHot TopicLearn more about 】 climate chang】e Hot 【TopicLearn more about climat【e change \ Browse today's tagsDanish billio\n】aire plans to b/uild idyllic vil\lage in【 Sc\ot/\land to stop land】 becomi//ng de\relictText sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000Thi/s regenerative fabric no\】uri【shes soi】l twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ife,见下图

Gree【n festival: partying conscio/】usl【y at Sziget Festival

】One of Europe&r\squ【o;s biggest music festivals ha/s take\n its eco-c/reden/tials to the ne】xt l\】evel this summer, with r\eusable pape】r t\e/nts, reu\sable /c\u【ps a\nd e】ven water-saving toilet\s.Sziget festival /on Haj\】ógy&a/a\cute;ri】 Is【land, B【udape\/st, Hungary, kicked off on Wednesday, with【 a raft 】o\f en/vir/onmen\tally-friend\ly impr/ovements, and a focus on the climate.\As we\ll as all the music and partying, the UN Messenger of Peac\e Dr 】Jane Goodall w【il【l be just 】one of the\ speakers promot/ing the imp【ortance o/f pr\otecting the \env\i\ronment at/\ the ne\a】rly week-long fes/tival.&l【dqu\o/;Last】 year we could replace one and a/ half million single-use glasse【s wit/【h a few hundred /】th\ousand of re【u【sable glasses,” said Ákos Dominus, 】project manager of the Green Is【land【 project.“This yea\r\, the Sziget festi/val will 】consume million plastic glasses less, and the number is rising/ ev】ery【 year. So we can see how】 sustain】able this \program is.&r】dquo;On 】Sziget’s l【ast day/, tents, sleepi】ng bags, and mats\ that have been left】 behind will 】be co【llected by cha【rity organizati\ons.Share this a【/rticleC/opy/paste the article vid/【eo embed lin/k be【low:Cop/yShareTweetShar/esendSha【reTweetS】haresendMore/HideShareSen】dShareSha\/reShareSendS\hareShareYou【【 might al】so l】ike 】 S【\zi\get fest】iv/al atte】ndee/s defend Coca C】o/la's #LoveIsLove campaign in Hu/ngary / 【 【 / Hunga】rian/s say 【goodb/ye /】to winter with bizarre and scary c\ostume festiv】a【l 【 【 \ Ras Al/ Khaimah \Fine Arts Festi\val spo】tlights Emira\t\i &/; int/ernational \talent 】 / More】 ab\outSziget【 festi】val】FestivalEnvi/ronmental prot/ection / B【ro】wse today�/39;】s tagsThis expo \is unit/ing designers wit【h【 thou【sands of responsibl【y \source\d materials 】Coronavirus/ latest: Donald【 Trump halts/ U/S payments to World Health /Organiz【a\ti】o】nDepl\eted f/ish stocks can’t w【ait. The EU and\ Norway need to commit to ending over【fishin【g now 【ǀ ViewFor 50 yea\r】s an Israeli【 o【il comp【【any has 】kept bathers 【off a Red Sea bea/ch near】 t/he resort of Eilat bu】t \it co【/uldn’t 】stop sea life from flouri\shing.I【n a wor\ld where co】【r】al r】eefs are s】hrink\ing rapidly, the one \in Eila\t has grown.Due/ to /a lack of human interf】e【rence,】 a spectacular /coral reef blo/】sso】med o】v【er time attracting exotic /fi】sh \and/【 dolphins to th/is 【aquatic paradi\se.The 300-me\tre-long be】ach was handed back to the publi\c a year an/d a half ago after the】 Eilat Ashkelon P【ipeline 】Company (EAPC) 【scaled back it\s operat】io【ns.Now, with access lift【【e/d, int】erest is /mounting 【f\rom scuba divers \an\d tourist】s/ alike w/ho want【 to vi】sit.In response, Israel's Na/ture and Par/ks Authority decided to relocate the cora\ls for their own pr/otecti】on so \the /ind】ustri/al de/bris left /】】by E【APC\ could be removed.S【hare this articleCopy/paste】 t【he article 【video embe】/d link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendS】hareTw】eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【areShare\ShareSendSh/areShareY/ou\ might also 【like 】 '\;Israel is no l/onger a democracy�】9;: Netan\yahu accused of exp【loi】ting coron/avirus to sa/ve career 【 / 】 \】 / / Israel e\】lection: Exit p/olls give Netanyah】u nar\r/ow/ lead / 【 \ \ 】 】 】 / 】 \ \/ / 】 】 Palestinian P\resident Ab】bas cu】ts ties with Israel a】nd US 】over peace plan / More aboutCora/lsIsrael\Envir【onmentEnvironmental protectio【noil 【industry】Touri\sm Browse today's tag】sA/ "monster fatberg," consisting of eve\rythi\ng that shou】ldn't\ 【have /been flu【shed 】down a】】 toilet or poured d【\own a \si\nk, has【 been d【isc】overed/ in Devon, E\n\gland.South We/st /Water (SWW) says the berg【, which\ i/s belie/】ved to the larg\est e【ver found in\ Devon, is\ 64 m【etres in length.To pu【t this into perspective, 【it /is 7 metres lon/ger than the height 【of Italy's Leaning Tower /of P】】isa,【 1【2 】metres longer than the he】ight of/ Nelson【's\ Colum【n in London, 【and 1】7\ metres【 lo】nger t/ha】n the \hei\ght of P/aris【'【 //Arc de Triomphe.It is 【f\ormed of ma\/ny\ wa【\ste 】products, including】 wet wipes, co【ngea/led fat, oil and grease inside the sewer.An【d the/ 【remov】al process isn't expected to be s/imple."This is g/oing t\o t/ake us several weeks to remove," SWW's Director of Wastewater Andrew Roantree said/ 】in a vi】deo \stat【/em/ent \on Twitter."I】t will b/e a difficult/ exercise for our guys, and we ne/ed to】 \do/ it to protect【 the bath【ing wat【er [on the c】oast]."Work to remove the /fatber\g is due to begin on F/ebr/uary 4, /where sew】er 】w【orker\s 】will【 use hig/h-pressure j\et【s, shovels, pi】ckax\es and speci/alist equipment to tac】kle】 the m\onster b【it by bit.The】】se sewer blockag【es costs customers &p】o/und;4】.5 mi【llion a yea【r," South Wes\t Wat/【er w/arne\d."Every ti/me a wet wipe is/ flushed or oil p/oured 【down the】 drain, \there i\s a risk these it【ems【 could \c\ause sewer blockages. This i/s【 extremely unpleasant and could happen in your own home."London '/b\erg'\However, Devon's discovery \is still no 】m【atch for the enormous 250 metre【-lon【g fatberg found in London's sewe】r system i】n 2017.Small p【ar/ts of this chunk o/f waste were later exhibited at the Mu/seum of London,/ while the rest was rec/ycl\ed as bio【fuel to power Lond】on's bus network.REA】D MORE:【/ "BI【N it, don't 【BLOCK】 it!" -】 Monster 'fatber/g' is foun/d in London\ sewerREAD MORE: London】's 'fatberg' moves fro\m sewer/ /to museumShare th】is art\icleCopy/past\e the ar【t\icle video embed link below:CopyShareTweetShare】sendShareTweetShar\esend【MoreHideShareSendSh\areShareShare【SendShareShareYou might al【so like 】 】 】】 \ A circular economy is within \reach if Eu\rop】/ean busines/ses grasp the opportunity ǀ V\iew / \ \ 】 】 】 \ 【 Th】e Ugandan/ singer /tu【rning plastic waste int】o d【rums \ 】 \】 【 Our d\【isposable culture must 【end. We need t/he ‘right to repair’【 not/ recycle our s【martphones】 ǀ】】 Vi\ew More a\boutwastewast\e disposalEnvir/onm/entEnvironmental protection 【 】 Brow/se today&\#0【39\;s tags,如下图

Depl\eted f/ish stocks can’t w【ait. The EU and\ Norway need to commit to ending over【fishin【g now 【ǀ ViewText 【size/A【aAaYou can d/ocument i】t, just like \ten/s of】 thousands of citizens around t】he worl】d /joi/ned \【\】forc\es for thr】ee d】ays to do so.In 2016【 the Nat\/ural History Museum/ of Lo【s/ Angeles County and California\ Academy of Sci/ence/s started a competition between the tw\o\ citi】es. The g/oal was to in\volve citi\zens in documen\ting nature to hel】p them understa\n】d the urban bi\odiversity】 around them. T\he friendly rival【ry between Los An【geles and San Fran】】cisco enc/ouraged a lot of people to compete and use thei/r c【am【【era and smartphone to\ ma】ke wildlife /obse/rvations.The City Nature Challenge became nationa】l by/ 2017 and internati】onal by 2018. La/st year nearl】y 70 c【ities around the wor【\ld were 【taking part in the com\petiti【on. With 17,000 p】eople partic【ipatin/g, /m/o】re than 441,000】 ob\servations were 】made and 8,600 species were captured. Of these pictured【 spec】ies, 599 of them we/r\/e rare, endangered and th/reatened. Th【/is year】, /the【/ Ci【ty Nature \Challenge got 【more\ than 150 c【ities involved.Click on th】e video above to】 l/earn\/【 more about t/】his year【's chal】lenge and o\ne/【 of the\ cities with the highest contribu\tion.】S】ha/r【e this artic\le】 / M\ore from places

】9;Em【otion【s run】nin/g high&#/039; in Brexit blame g\a\me

如下图

通信技术Green growth: promot/ing i【n【n】ovation and sus/ta\in/ability to foster busines\s in Europe\Is f】ast/ fashion slowing down?At the s\troke of midnight on Tuesday, Italy said good\bye to c\otton bu】ds, as \the New Year ushe/red】 in 【the country\'s latest push to eliminate single\-use plastic produc】【ts./】Fro/m Ja【nuary 1, it is forbidd/en to/ \pr【\od\uce\ or 】\【sel【l /non-biodegradable or comp\ostable cotton buds.】/ Packaging will also h】ave【 to indicate 【the rule\s/ 【for proper 【di【sposal.Cotton buds account for\ about 9% of waste f【oun/d on 】Italian\ beac\h【e【s】 &/mda/sh; an average of about 60 sticks per beac/h.Italy is the fi【rst European Un【ion country to implement\ s【uch a ban but it won't be the last. In O/ctober, th/e European Parliament voted t\o o【utl】aw most/ si/ngle/-use plastics, start/ing【\ in 20/21.Next New Year's Day, Italy will\ bring i【n【 a\ ban on【 c【o\smetics cont/a【ining microplastics. T【hese are tiny plas【tics g】r】ai\ns found in some exf/oliants and】 detergents 【t\ha】t end \u【p in river】s \and seas, whe】re they are e\aten by fish【 an】d integrated into the【 food chain.Brussels has warned that by 2】050 th】ere wil/l be more 【plastic in th【e /oceans than fish, if nothing is done.Shar\e t/hi/s \articleShareTweetSha【resendShareT\wee【tShar【e【sendMoreHideShareSendSh【areSh\areShareSendShareShareYo/u might a\lso like 【 2/018 Review【: Single-】use plastics to be ban\ned \in EU 【 / 】 【 】 \ QUIZ: So you /think y\ou know about plastic pollution? Test your knowledge now / \ \ / Which Europea【】n countries are th【e \best and worst/ /at r【ec】y\clin\g plastic【 waste/? 】【 【 【 More aboutplasticMicroplasticsEn/vir】onm【【ental protection / Bro】wse tod【\ay's tagsCapturing CO2: How to r\educe carbon dioxide emissions from the ceme【nt in】dustr/y

G\r【eece \told to �/39;save your 【paradi\se as oi】l \compa【n【ies move in

Watch: British sculptor cre\ates a【 /marine e【xhibition\ in Tuscany\

1.澳门凯时官网

Tourism set to bl\oom in Angola’s desert regionWATCH | From castles to cabins, \these homes/\ 】w【ere 】ma\de of wa】steText sizeAa】AaThere/’s a r/ea\son 】car bodywork is often referred to as ‘coachw【o\r/】k’. It】&rsquo】\;s【 beca】u/se the e\arliest cars /were】 litt【le more th/a\n motor/ised】【 version of h\orse【-drawn\ coach【es with passenger compartments usually made from wooden skeletons clothed in more wood, le【ather or fabric.\ \As car】 design moved】 on, s【o did】 the construction /of /their bo【dies to ste/el and aluminium. Now we are seeing a diversificati/on of /materials used to 】skin 】cars to\ maximise their s\/af//et】y and to ensure they /are lightweigh/t as well as】 s/ustainabl/e.Th\【is heralds a period of developme【nt and innova/tion tha【t hasn&\】rsquo;t been seen since the i/nt】roduction of carbo\n fibr/\e to Formu【la/ 1 racing /ca\rs in 1981.】 Bef【ore that, glassfibre was the \oth/er mo【s\t no】teworthy step fo【\r【ward in mat】eria\ls 【when it became a\ pop【ular choice】 fo\r creati【ng/ /【】comple】x shapes in the 】early 1950s for numerous home-bu\il\d specials.Related | Flying/ cars:\ ho】w close are we?Li/gh【twei】【ght \carbon fibreTo】day, the d】\eve】lopment of】 n\ew m【ate\rials is being undert【ak】en in a more structured and scienti\fic man\ner./ This 【i【s cle\ar f【rom 】the approach be【ing tak/en 【to creati/ng \car【【bon fibr】e that’s cheaper and eas【ier to】 produce. Lightweig【ht carbo】n】【 fibre is/ idea【l for man【y】 exterio/r car bod\y par【ts as it can/ be mou\lded into【 multi-contoured shapes easil【y w/hile】 remaining very strong to resist the k【nocks and bump【】s that car【s\ have to endure in normal life.Reducing the cost of maki\ng carb【on fibre also addresses one \of the drawbacks【 of this】 material in the past: 【th】e cost of repairing or repl】acing【 it. For example, fixing\ Ro/w】an Atk\inson】’s McL\aren F1 with \all of its carbon fibre part【s 】is thou/g【ht【 to h】av\e been the largest ever vehicle】 insurance pay-out in UK his\】tory at &po/und;910,000.Wonder/ material from【 recycled c】lo\thi【ng 【Voir\ cett【e public】ation】 sur Instagram】U/ne publication partagée par Faraday Fut\ure \(@fa】radayfutu\re) le 27 /\Juin 2018 &/ag【【rav\/e; 11 :27 PDTToday, we find carbon\ 【fibre in u\se a】cross many\ mainstream cars,/ tho\ugh/ it tends to【 b\e us/ed in str\ategic areas whe\re\ stren】gth and lightweight materi/als【 ar【e cr【uci【al. Using【【 carbon fibre /more widely】 /lowers m/anufacturing costs, which 【is why comp【anies li/ke Fara【da\y F\uture based 【in California, USA are【 wo\r/k】ing on ma/\king th】is wonder m\ater】ial from recycled clothing. By bre\aking th】e materials down\ to t【heir】 /molecular\ 】leve/l】, it&r】squo;s possible to re-\engin/e】er them in】to carbon f】ibr/e.Related |If you c/ou/ld】 fly cl\eanly, would you?R】odrigo Caula/, a \material designer at Faraday, e/xplai【n/s: "【It sou】nds like science fiction\, but it’s happ/】ening now. We can extrude \entirely new bi】o-based fibr/es with special equipment and re-engineer the molecu\lar properti\es of \the sour【ce material \dur/i【ng this proce\ss. /You\ co【uld technic\ally design a fibre to be h\ydrophobic, fire【 retardant or /biodegradable\ – it’s almost alch】】【emy.】"Howeve\r, in/dustry】 anal//ysts 】reckon the average car wil】l only have a 15% carb【/o【n fibr\e content by 2040. The majorit/y \o\f the \】\remaining material w/【ill remain steel, but much of this w】ill be mor】e speciali/sed versions of\ st/eel such as //Ult/ra High】 Strength Steel and boron steel fo【r】 key co/mponents. That’s good for the rig】idity /of/ 【the car and its /c/rash-worth】ines/s, but the more specialised the ste\el, the /more difficult /it becomes 【to recycle.】So, for bodywork, composite materials lik\e carbon fibre rem\ain 【the key to th\e future. While carb【on fibre is \becoming \mo】\r\/e a/fforda【ble and easier to make, there are other co\mposites being develo】ped. Plastic is one of the 【key】s to this【, even if it\ hasn’t had th/e be】st reput/ation d】ue to 】its【 environme】】ntal impact.Rela】ted |Zooming in o/n the future of electric mo【torcyc/lesInte【/rior panels mad】e with p/las\tic w【aste found in the /oceansFaurecia car interiorFaurecia carsFor vehicle use,【 plas\tics are now being develop【ed from the same material that has been t【aken from /wa】ste sources, e\it【her from\ recycled packaging or even extracted from the se】a. BMW has been l/eadi\ng th】e wa【y in this field and its i3 already /has 【interior panels made【 from/ \c/apt【ured plastic waste from the oceans.Exterior body pane//ls a】re also】 being m【ad/e fro/m/ 】/plastic that i/nclu【des 20% hemp fibre. Automotive supplier Faurec/ia 【ha/s been de/】【velopi】ng this f【or so【me time and has/ created a process that allows the plastic t【o be in\jectio】n \moulded so it can form difficult curves while al】so being lighter【 than m\o/st o\ther formed pla/stic panels【.As well as\【 this sort of innovation, more traditional materials are als】o making a co\/meback f】or car bod\ywo\rk.\ A pr】【ime e/xa\mple of this is wood, 】\but not/\/ th】e sort of plank【s a/n\d varnished t】imbers 【of】 old. Instead, wood pulp【 \is bei\ng developed by Toyota becau\se /the finis】h/ed produ/ct/ 【is f\iv/e times stronger than steel yet 80% lighter. This【 has big ramificatio/ns\ as th【e wo】rld moves more toward【s】 electric vehicles with t【heir h\eavy ba【ttery pa\cks w/here wood pulp can help /\offset this \bulk.Aluminium 】is\ another trad【i/tional \mat/erial /that is far from the end of its development fo【r vehicle bo/dy【 panels. Traditionally used f/or lightweight \sports cars, aluminium is now more widely\ used as\ it off【e\r【s】 the same strength as【 s】t】eel for 】much/ /less weight【. That&rs】qu【o;s 【【ideal f\or exterior pa【nels and a【】lum/【inium is al】so easier to/ \work with when 】prod】/ucing panels i\n \bulk quan】titi【es.Re/lated | Meet the leather maker w\ith th\e lowest carbon footprint in the worldL【ooking around all/ of the /major motor shows in recent times, it&rsquo\;s obvi】ous tha【】t car \】make】r【s 【are diversifying their b/ody panel materi【als. For some, environmental im【pact is t\he prime fa【ctor】, but for/ others it】 offe\【rs the chance to pick fr/om a greater choice of materi/als to suit very specific pa【rts【 of a car&\rsquo;s exterior, which almost completes the circle back to the origi】ns of coachbuilding.Words: Al】isda【ir \Su【ttieShare this ar\ticle 】 \ More from lifeI【】schia: Ital\ian island at risk of qu\akes or eruptions【 'in the hands of 】the Eternal Father&【#039;Zoom\ing in on t【he】 future of el\ectric moto】rcycles

2.澳门凯时官网。

Defo\restation in 【the Brazilian Amazon \rainforest went up by 13.7% between August 2017 a【nd\// /July 2018【, accordin】g\ t【o the \coun】t【r/y’s\ Natio/n/al I/nstitute for /Space Researc\h (I\NPE).The INPE】 said that【 becau/se /of the incr/eased/ deforestation,\ Brazil had lost a\ total area of 7.900 km&/sup【】2; of rainforest, which G\reen【peace Br/azil estimates is c】lo\se t\o a million】 football pit【ch【es or five times the 【\size of 【London — Europe's larg/est city by\ area.Brazil has t】he\ largest】 sur/face of the A】mazon rain【forest in South Ame【rica.Our pic\ture gallery shows 【the scope of deforestation this pa】st year /in Brazil's Amazon for】est/....New Gallery 2018】//28 © Christian 【Bra【ga / 【Green】peac】eo【riginal/date 1/1/0001 6:00:0/0 AMwidth \】1200he\igh】t 801 &cop【y/】; Christian Braga \/ Greenpeaceoriginaldate 1/1/00/01 6:00:00 AMwidth】 2】5】/00height/ 16REU\TERS/UESLEI MARCELINOor/iginaldate \/1/1/0【001 6:00:00 AMwidth 6720heigh/t 4480 © C/hristian Braga /\【【 Gre】e】np【eacecameramake NIKON C【ORPORATIONfocal/length 24h【ei/ght 800fnumber 6.3exposu/retime】 0.】00062【5alt: 2/60lat【: 【/-10.754733【l/ong: -68.743800】c【/amerasoftwa【re Adob【e\ Photosho】】p Lighoriginaldate 10//3/2018】 3:50:36 PM\width 1200c\ameramod/】el /NIKON /D850 © C/hristian Braga / Greenpeac【ecameramake NIKON CO/R【PORA】T/IONfocal】leng】】th 31height 800fnumber 【10e\xposuretime 【0.000】al【t: 240la/t: -9.8】9893/3long: -68.710900camerasoftwar】e Adobe】/ Photoshop Lighor\iginaldate 10/3】//20 5:32:40 PMwidt\h 1200cameramo【del NIKON D850 © Christian Braga / Greenp/ea【cecam】eramake 】NI\K\ON CORPORATIONfocallength 95he【ight 800fnumber 4.5\exp\osuretime 0.000】625cameraso【ftware Adobe Pho】toshop L【ighorigi/naldat/e 10】/2/2018【 9:43: PMwidth /1200\cameramodel N\IKON【 D850According to Gr【eenpeace Brazil, the /cause for 】the i【\ncreased defore/station lies in】 【Brasilia with the government.The NGO blam\es the rural lob\by i【n【 C【ongress for\【 &ldqu】o;threat\ening the rainforest, its peop】le,\ and the planet’s climate&【rdquo;.The l【obb】y’】s agenda incl【udes promo/tin【g farm/ers’ rights, expa【nd\ing】 arable lan\d in the country, and opposes the e【xpa【nsion of indigenous lands, according to 【\【Brazilian me【dia.“This set o】f pr】opo【s】als benefit those who want t【o destroy】 the rainfor【est, g\rind l】an【d】\, and steal the natur/al】 heri【\ta【ge of the Brazilian peop【le. The consequences are translated into 】the a】moun【】t of\ destruction/ in the Amazo】n,” said M\arcio Astrini, coor/di/【nator of public policy for Gre/e/npeace 】Br/azil.Brazil's 【environment minister/ Edson Duarte said i/n 【a statement】 that illegal logging was the main fact\o【r for 】the increas【ed de\forestation. While Brazil's Cl/i\ma/te Ob】servatory, a net】【work of NGOs, said in another statement that ap】art fro\m/ illegal loggin\g it was the growi】ng】 commodities s】ector that was\ c【on/tributin\g to fo【re【st destruc】tion. The green NGO also w/arns th】at the environmental politi/c】s of Braz】il's ne】w presiden【t【, Jair B【olsona\ro, co\uld furth\er devastate the 】rainforest."He's\ said \that\ he would put an end to protecte【d areas【, to lands reserve】d to indigenous communities, that h】e would reduce inspections /and sanctions aga/】in/st e】nvironmental cri】mes. Every】thing that reduc【ed def【orestation 【before. If he 【elimin\ate】s】 all of this,/】 it would trigger a【n unimaginable si/tuation," said Astrini】.Euronews has reached out to【 G】ree【npeace Brazil for comment\ on th/e current defore/station of Br\az\il's Amazon ra】in】forest.Share this articleShareTweetSha/resendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShareSha/re\Send【Sha【reShareYou might a\lso \like \】】 Watch:】 Footage of uncontacted Amazon t】ri/be m】emb/ers e/merges/ as /deforesta【tion expands \ \ \ \ 】 【 Amazon wildfires: Wh【y is\ the South /Americ/an rainforest 【so important? 】 】 \ 】 / Amazon fires 】generate smoke clo】ud almost a/s \bi\g as devastating\ Siberia blaze \ 【\】 //M\ore a/boutEnvironment\Envir】onm】ental protectionBrazilAm\azonia 【 Browse today【'\;\s tagsBy 2050 around 80% \o/f th/e w/orld's po/pula\t】ion w\ill 【be【 living i\n urban areas.【Currentl\y, they occ\upy【 3% of the Earth's】 surface but produce around 72% of gr/eenhouse gases.Gro\wing urba【nization along with climate change will have a 【seriou\s impact on 】o/ur life in /【citie】s in\ ter/ms o\f air quality, warmer tem】peratures and high\er 】【floo】【d 【risk.But /so【lutions 【to reducing the environment\al impact and i【mpro/ving people's quali【ty of life\ ha/【s been found i/n nature/.Scientists【 working at the European project UR\BAN Gre\en-Up【 in Va/【【【l\ladoli】d, /Spa】i//n are te/sting Nature-\Based Sol【utions (NBS) that could a【llow sustain】able urban development.【Involvin\g 25 partner\s from 9 countrie\s /and 8 cities, the p】rojec/t found that the】 key is in th/【e natural properties which ca】n be employed to】 mitigate climate change effects.URBAN 【Gr【een-Up proj【ect coordinator, R\a&uac\ute;l Sánche】z Fr/ancés, explains】 【that some plants can wo/rk as a therm【o-re/\gul】a/to】r and reduce the temperature of 【s【urround/ing【s./"For th】at, we have solutions like green roofs, mobile v\ertical garde】n \or green\ f/aca/des."An im】【por【ta【n】t part of/ t/he project is dedicated to 【th】】e tr【e/atment of air\ an\d】 rainwater in cities.S】pecific type/s of plants, thro/ugh】 their leaves and roots, can work \as natura\l filters."/That solution is an urba【n biofilter," sa/\ys Franc&eac】ute;s】/\. "We used /to call /it green \【chi\mney. We want【 t\o install it on the roof close to the chimneys to clean up th/e】 【【output of\ combustion.""This system is able 【to mainly catch n】itrogen oxides an【d 【\【part/icu【late matter, the two m\ain pollutants 】issued by vehicles and heating systems.The po【tential of nature-based sy【\stems is significant.For example】, in Valladolid a cycle \lane and a】 g【ree】n pavem/ent could pre\v\ent the emiss\ion\ of n/early 200 tonnes CO₂//; and reduce \te/mperatures by 5°C du/ring summer.But the cit\y&\r【squo;s configurat\ion 【/is】 a 【fa/ct【or to】 deal with/."We h】\ave to solve some iss【ues, the main one is t】he lack 】\of sp】ace. Then, w】e \also have problems 【【with o】ccupy】【ing public spaces, b/ecause we 】have unde】【rground w【ater【 pipes, e】lect/ri\c n【etwo【rk, underground p\arking," says Alicia Villazán Cabe【r【】o, a s】enior e【nvi/ronmental consultant at Valladoli【d city 】council【.Valladolid, /Spain, Izmir, Turkey and】 Liverpool, UK are the /three front r/unners 】citie】s wh【】】ich are t/e/sting more than \forty na【\ture】-based methods.Liverpoo】l【 is a city with huge traffic density: 1.35/ b】illion /vehicle】 miles were travelled on】 its roads in 2018 acc\ording t\o officia【l statistic//s.B【ut solutions like arboreal interventions, for instance, are ex】pected to r【educe carbon】 emission【s by 5.55 tons p】er ye】ar and te】mpe/rature】s by 2-4°C during 】the summer seas】on."We have issues \wit【h air q/uali\/ty in Liverpool. We【 /h【av【e a few hotsp】ots 】\around the ci【ty so \【these\ trees will hel/p us clean up 【there,"【 says Fernando N\u/&/nt】ilde;ez Veiga, the/ divisi\onal /ma】nager for majo//r\ hi】ghwa】ys/ projects at Liver】/p】o/ol city /council."The trees are just pha】se one. We ha/ve planted 1 trees//, the p【lan is to plan【】t more than 150 trees.【 That wil/l h【elp \to clean /up this area."The b\【irthplace of Be】atles is implementing several tail\ored strategi【es, /such as green routes, bio pollutant filters, 【pollinator gardens, and sust/aina】ble dra【inage\ systems to reduce the impact of flood risks.【"What we a】r】e looking to】 do is to put thes/e 】green】 interventions into the right place in the c】it【y; \we wi【ll be】 monit【ori\ng air qu【alit【y, water quality, biodivers【ity, looking \at wellbe/】ing/, people’s percep】tion of/ the \area, and /loo\king a】t some economi/c indic【ators as well," sa\ys Juliet Stapl】es, a s\enior pr【ojec【\t manager for URBAN \【Greenup 】at Liverpo\ol c【ity coun/cil.Once the whole set of nature-/based【 s【oluti【ons】 is 【v【alidated, it will be transf/erred to a\nother five cities; Mantov】a, Italy【; L【udw】igsburg, Ger/man【y\; Medellin, Colombi/a; Cheng/du, China; Binh Dinh, Vietnam and \replicated all over the world, to green up our more/ and more overcrowded urb【an areas.1212121212121212J/ourn\alist name/ • \Katy Dartf\ordShare this articleCopy/paste the artic/le video embe\d li】nk below:CopyShareTweetS\haresendSh/areTweetSharesend/MoreHideShareSen/dSh】areShareShareS【en\dShareShare】You might a】lso like 【 / Smart farming: how tec【\hno\logy is i】mproving animal welfare and efficiency in agriculture 【 \ \ / / 】\ 】 / Can d】rones help/ greek olive oil producers【】/? / / \ Captu】rin【g CO2: How to\ reduce ca/rbon d/ioxide/ 】emi】ssions 】from the ceme】nt indu】//stry / 】 】 More aboutEnvironmen\tal prote】c【tionEcologyScience【 \ Most vi】ewed \ / /【 】 Wha】t influence o\n climate/ i【/s /th\e cor【onavirus lo\ckdown rea\lly hav\i【ng? 【 【 】Th【e\ new AI system safeguarding pre\ma\/ture babies from/ 【infection\ 】 \ / Messenger RNA/: t\he molec/ul\e【 that may teach【 our b【od\ie\【s to beat cance/r / / Apple and Googl【e \say they'll work together t】o 【trace spread】 of coronavirus via sma】rtphones 】 How EU funding is chang】ing the fac】e of Lat/vian innovat/ion 【 【 】 Browse today�/39;s tagsText sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000Gra/pe skin leather\ is one of the】/ alternativ/es. \ twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ife】9;Em【otion【s run】nin/g high&#/039; in Brexit blame g\a\me】Du\bai an/d the United Arab Emir/a】tes are making anima\l con/se】\rvation a government priority at a time /when b】iodiversit\【y is unde】r threa\/t /and more anima】l】s fa【ce\ extinction globa/】l/ly.A re】port by the United Nations\ earlier this/ year claim\ed animal extinctio】ns are at an unpr/eced【en【t/ed high. Acco】rding【 to t\he organi】sa】ti\on, as many as one \m/illi【on species are under threat.On a visi\t to t【he 】desert, you/ 】might expect to f】ind ca/mels or】 antelope】, 【m】aybe \some /hawks.\ But Du】ba】i&rs\qu\o;s A】l Marmoom【 animal sanctuary 【】is/ teeming with 】biodiversi【ty with hundreds of differ【ent /species of】 birds, m【a/mmals, and rept【iles】.T【he sa/nctuary covers 20 percent of t】he whole area o/f Dubai. In the begin】ning, 】it\ was a desert popula\ted b/y nati\ve a【nimals, bu\t as the san\ctuar\y【 exp/anded \t】o m\ore than 50 oases, it was discovered/ these water bodi\es/ could cont【rol the environment【al b\alan/c\e.The sa\nctuary has even man】a/ged\ to at】tr【act the Arabian O】ryx. Thi】\【s an】i\mal w【as declared exti/n【ct in t【he w/ild in 1972, but has now been br】ought back from the\ b\r【ink by the reserve.Saoud F\aisal is a wildlife o\ffi/cer \at the】 Al Marmoom sanctuary. He says in the 80s an/d 90s the Oryx /wer】e o【verh\unted for food. Now t】he animal】 is cons\i【dered part o\f the r\egion's wildlife/】.&ld/quo;They are to/tally protected now/ an【d also they are he【althy,” he【 explains. “We have them in【 large numbers whic】h last year reached【 more tha【/n 500."From deser【t 【oases to in\door tropical environments, recent laws in Dubai mean gre/ater g】ove】rnment【al support for animal sanc/tuaries.Laws were introduced in 2007 to cover 【anima\l welfar\e, but awa【reness r】e/ally s】tart\ed\/ to build in 2016/. The laws /also apply to \rare and exotic animals.\ Some are /looked aft\】er in anim/al sanct/uaries like Green Pla/net.Everything about Gree【n Plane】t w】as de/si/gned specifically to 【create 】the ideal habitat for tropical 】p【lants】 a】nd a【n/imals in】 t】he mid】dle of the D】ubai de【ser【t】.The sanctuary house\s a wid【e range o【f /spe/cies including many diffe/rent birds, and ma\mmals such as two-toed】 slo\ths. And lizards l】ike gree/n/ iguanas or basi\lisks.The latest】 addition t/o /the Gree\n P】lanet family is a male Slow Loris /named/ Lo】nely by staff. But t【his wide- eyed, rare pr】imat\e wasn&【rsquo;t【】 lon】ely fo】\r long.As【 he is a critica/lly e】ndangered animal, the search was on to fin/d 【him a compan\ion, \A couple /of months later, a /female【 Slow Loris of the 【【same】 specie【s was also res/cued. These animals【\ mate for 【lif【e 【and\ af/ter they wer/】e int/roduced to each 【oth【e/r【 a【ppea【red to 】get along w/e】ll,【 】raising/ hopes there may 】be a baby Slow\ Loris/ in the near fut\ure.Sh\ar\e this articleCopy/paste the article 【vi】deo 【embed link below:CopyShar/eT\weetShares/e/ndShareTweetS】ha】resendMoreHi/deShareSe【ndSh】areShareShareSe/n【dShareShareYou might also【 like\ 【 【 The appeti/te for local sustainable 】food【 /produce in the Un】/ited Arab Emirates 【 【 】 / / \ \ Dubai acts t】o ste/m the tide of single use pl【astic \ \ 】 【 \ New era 】for Benidor\m as resort embraces sustainabi/lity / /】 / Mor【e aboutEnvir/onment/al prot【ecti/o\nFa\una and FloraD】ubai United Arab Emirates Most viewed Beijing is their cam【\pu/s/: Inside the 【Ch\/in\ese capita【l’s li/fe-c】hanging/ study tour】s \ 【 】 【 \ 9/ places to vi/sit on your cul\tural trip around\ Croatia / 】 The Palm Jumeirah: Dubai's sy【mbol of creati【vit】\/y and ambition 】 Marke【ts,/ coffee an/d stre\/e】t art: d【i\scovering Zagreb's secret delights 】 / Gr【eek is】lands of history and culture 】 \ 】【 Browse/ today's tags

3.澳门凯时官网。

For many ages, D】anish fishermen have been u\si】ng cl/】inker-built oaken boats, ligh/\】twei/ght and\ flex/ibl】e enough to land directly on 】sand beaches. Thi【s t\raditi】ona】\l 【/wa】y of coastal fishing is considered【 】】more friendly to the marine environment than large-scale \【industri【al me\thods.【But can the boat-b/uilding craft survive the curren【t decli】ne 【of Danis/h\ fishing vi/llages? Fish/ermen and other activists fro】m the Jammerbugt mun【icip\ality of Denmark are \hopi【ng t\o preserve the tradit【ion for at least \anothe\r 100/ years by b\ui\lding 10 new N\ordic 【sea boats for the \young gener/ation of small-scale coastal fishers. Their asso/ciation【, &ldq/uo;Ocean/【 in Balance”, has laun\ched a public cam【paig】n aiming to raise 7/,150,000\ euro【s for th】e boats.【I【n this 360-degree video, Thomas H【øjr【up, the chairman of/ &ldqu\o;Ocean in Balance”, sh\ows us around \a clink】er-built bo\at curren】tly u】n/der cons【truction, exp】laining \the un\ique way the\se boats are de/signed 】and b/ui【lt.【】Journalist name/ • Denis Loc】tierV【i】deo e】d【\it】【or • De\nis 】】LoctierShare this artic/leShare】TweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideSha\reSendSha/reShareShareSendShareSha/reYou\ might al】/so l】ike 】 【 】 \Dan【i/sh fisheries t【ak】】e back 】contro\l 【 】 【 / \ \ 】 How small scal【e fisheries saved Da【nish】 fishi/ng communi【ti【e】s 】 】【 【 \ What’s killing our unde\r】water ecosystems? 【 More abo\ut360° videoFisheryD\e/nmarkEnviron\m\ental protection \ Most 【viewed 】【 】 \ 【 】 】 What 【i//nfluence on climate is the coronav】irus lockdown re】ally having? \ 【 \ / 】 T\he new \AI system safeguarding 】premature babies from】 infection \ / 【【 \Messenger RNA: th【e molecule t\ha】t may 】teach our bodies to b【eat cancer /【】 /【 】 \ \ Apple and Google/ say they【9;ll wo【rk toge】ther to 】trace spread of coron/avirus via smart【phones \ How EU funding i\s c/hanging th\e face/ o【f Latvian\ inn】ov】ation 】 \ Br】owse today�s tag/sNe】w edible in-flight meal t/ray designed for【 plane jo】ur【neysOur s【eas a】re 【facing increasi】ng competition for spa/ce and reso/urces — between o\ld sectors, su【】c\h as fishing, and new, such as offshore wind farms.\T/his compe【tit】ion can\ lea】d to \c】onfl/icts.\ Uncoordin\at【ed use of marine space al/so【 threatens the he】alth of the oc【ean, adding to\【 the destructive \effects of c】limate/ c】hange.P/rote【cting the ma\r【ine e/nvironment, re/d/ucing conflicts and e\ncouraging investment are t【】he aims of maritime 【spatial planning【, or/ MSP &m【dash; a proce/\ss th/a【t puts economic ac\tiv\ities and ecosystems on a map. Aut\horities \and stakeholders work together, developing plans at local, national an【d t\rans\national levels.It’s /essent/ial that different economic \sec/tors, a\gencies a【nd governments cooperate fo】r the proces\s to 【/be】 successful. The European Commission and IOC-UNESC\O ar】e d\evelop】ing int【ernati【onal gu/idelines to promote m/ari\time spatial】 plann/ing around the world.The】 goal /is to trip】le the marine a】re【\a benef【iting f【rom MSP by】 】2030, covering【 30 per cent of m\aritim\e area/s under【 national j】urisdiction.Shar】e this 】articleShareTweetShare】send】S/hareTweetSharese【ndM【oreHideShareSendShareShareShareSen】dShareShare/More a\b【outOceanEnvironmental /protec/\tionFish\eryPortugal360° vi】deo \ Most viewe/【d \ 【】 / 】 / What influence on climate i】s】 the coronavirus lockdown r/eally having? 【 / 【The\ new AI system 】safeguarding \【premature bab【ies from/ /i\nfecti/\on / 】 // / / Messenge\r【 RNA:\ the molecule that may teach our bodies 【\t】o beat cancer\ 】 【 / Ap【ple and Google sa】y they'/【;ll work \together to trace sprea\d of coro/navirus via sm\ar】t【phones / / 【 How EU funding is changin/g the face \of L/atvian\ innovatio/n】 】 】 \ Browse to\day's t】agsSea chan/ge: how one small str/etch【 of c】o【【as\tline \in Italy transformed it【self \

4.Life under /t】he s【ea【 is at risk\. I】nternational tar】gets for pro\tecting /biod/iversity appear t/\o\/ be out of reach/. By 2020】, 】countries w【ith a co\astline must 】】esta【blish【 Marine Protected/ Areas (MPAs) to ensure the conservation of wildlife\ and flora. According to a stu//dy by the WWF, 】the European Union is far from leading the way/."We have 23 M/ember S【ta\tes w\ith marine area in the EU. 1】9 of these】【 are under the %【 limit of 【hav\ing effective mana/】gement /\for 】protected areas and w/ith just【 one year to go. And what's even mor【e alarming is tha/t half of the【m, 1//1 of them, have no 【manage【ment pl【ans what【soever, de\veloped or reported," exp【lai【ns Jani】ca Borg, Mari】ne Protecti\o【n an】d Spatial Plann】in\g Policy Coordinator a【t the WWF/ Europea】n Policy Office an/d lead author.EU \countries should/ set aside nearly 12% of their marine areas 】as mari【ne protected are】as. But according to the\ NGO, the bloc's share curr】ently accounts for less t】han 2%."I【'm d\isappoi\nted because fr/om the point o\】f】 view o\f the fishing industry marine prot/ected ar/eas offer /g】reat opport【unities to provid\e nurseri/es\ fo\r fish 【an/d to allow the fish to become\ bigger.\【 And/ as we know bigger i\s be】tter beca//use 】big fish breed in/ more numbe\rs. So ma【r/ine p/r\o【tecte/d are\a】s, /10】%, 15%, provide a g【r/eat bac\kground for 【a fish/ing in\dustry," Chr/is DAVIES (UK), Member of the Eur\opean Parliament,\ Renew Europe gro】up, cha】ir of the Comm】itte\e 【on Fisheries told Euronews.The protection o\f b【iodi\ver\sity varies from\ one ma\ritim】e area【 to another\. Addi【tio【nal efforts are needed\ in the Mediter【ranean and th】e Bl\【】/ack Sea. Without the】se】 marine pro【tected areas, \th/e survival of our oc/】eans is at risk.Share this articleCopy/paste】 the 【】arti【cle video/ \embed link be】【low:【Co【pyShareT/weet\SharesendShar/eTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareSh\areShareSendShareSh/areYou m/ig/ht 】al【so like 】 /Watch:/ Rescuers /save Orcas stranded on Argen【t【in】e b】each / 【 / E【U fis】h quota \quarrel -【 min【isters】 hail d【eal, NGOs/ 【sl//am overfishi】ng】 【 【 \/\ / 【 The/ Battle for】 /Brussels roads 【 \ More aboutEnv【i\ronmenta\】l protectionPollutionWWF 】 Browse today】's tags。

\Founda/tion promot【es sustainable food 【product/i】【on“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Environmental】【ists' anger after Hung【ary cuts d【own EU-protected for\es\t 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsThe European Union he/ld its fir【st post-B/rexit/【 summit h\alf【 a\ year before Br】//exit.And in\ orde】【r【 to 【get ev【erybody used \to\ it, The】resa May was 【absent.Which】 ma【de sense, as】 th\e meeting informally d/iscuss\ed what 【Europe's fut【ure 】priorities should look like.Nobody wanted h【er to be part of that c【onversa\【tio【\】n, and/ t【he B\ritish\ Pr】ime Minis/ter 【w\as /probably relieved not to h/ave to contribute to 】t/hat brain【s\torm\/ing.London might also hav/e been uncomfort【/able wit/h the venue: the 】city of Sib】iu in T/rans【ylvania】 where D\racula came from, especially with t/he /next Bre【xit】 deadline falling on H\alloween.T\he EU leaders /ag\reed o】n【\】 ten points regardin/】g the fut/ure o/f Europe.Cli/mate change featured only tenth as a/ prio/rity &n/dash;】 a fact that was \immediately critic【ized /by the E【uropean Gre【en】s, not present i】n S\ibiu.They called\】 it an insu\lt to th\e young people who have bee/n vo\icing\ their 【concerns about climate chan\ge for mont\hs.Yet not everything 【is【 gl/oomy when it /】/come t/\o\ environmental politics in Europe.The day before the summit,/ eight membe/r states 【【present【ed a plan to【 cut CO2 【emissions 【t【o net zero/ by 2050.Notably】 absent was a countr】y that cut emissions twice as muc【h/ a】s the EU average last ye【ar –\ Germany.Wher\eas E】urope was trying t\o tackle climate change politically,】 the world was dist】【racted by another crisis.One that could e【asily 】【】intensify in the months ahead【.I'm talking abou【t】 /the Iran nu\clear deal which seems to on the verge of collapsing/ after Teh/r【an a\nno【unced】 t】hat it plans to cease some co\mmitments.Yet【 the one behind/ the slow death of the agree】ment is Donald Trump.He walk【ed away from【 it last yea【r, showcasing hi\s dis\dain for diplomacy and what once was a huge multilateral br【eakthrough.Next weekOn Monday, Hungarian Prime Mini】ster Viktor Orba】n will meet US Pres\id【ent Donald T】rump【 at the White 【H/ouse.The meeting will pair t【wo populist/ leaders/ who want 【to restrict migrati/【on, /have vilified jou\rnalis\】】ts and fostered 】tensions with th\e E/uropean Union.On Tue\sday, Rus【si【an Fo】reign Minister 】Sergej 】L\avro【v hosts his US counterpart M\i/ke P【ompeo in Sotchi.Their 】talks will fo【cus /on finding 【a solu\tion to the escalating crisis/ in Venezuela.And on W\ednesday, the candidates f/or the presid\ency of \the E\U Com/miss【i【on wi】l【l 】deb/ate i//n the \European Parliament 】in【 Brus/sels.This debate will be t/he onl/y【 one t】o b】ring together all\ the lead /candid【ates vying to be 】the su【ccess【or of Jean-Claude J\u【ncke/r.Last WordThis time i】t goes to\ /Jean-Claude Juncker./】 T\】he EU Commission President, at/ a press conference, w【ho tal【ked\ ab/out hi【s bigg/est m【【istakes in office."The sec/o/nd mist/ake I made was】 to listen too car/efully/ to t【he Br【itish government, Ca\mer】on, because t【h【e then-Pri】me Minister asked me not to interfere, n\ot to intervene in t/he refe【rendum campaign.It was a mistake not to intervene an\d 】n】ot to interfere becaus\e we would hav\e been the onl】y ones to \destroy 【th】e lies, which \were ci【rculated aroun】d. \I was wr/ong to be silent a【t an important moment."Share th】is art\icleCopy/paste th】e a【rticle \video/ 【embe\/d link below:CopyShareTweet【SharesendSh\areTweetS】haresendMoreHideShareSendSh】areS/ha】reSh\areSendShareShareYou/ mi/ght also like 】 \ / 】 Five stories you may h】ave /\missed /\due to\ coronav【irus 】【 【 】【 】 \ 】 【 EU 【leaders【 m】e\et v【i【a video-conferenc/e - so do our c】orres/ponden】【ts / 【 】 \ / Brexi【t: U/K 'w\【【ill not seek tra//de talks ex\tension&\#039; despite Barnier【 having CO\VID-19【 More aboutEU SummitBre\xitJean-Claude Ju【nckerEnvironmental protection \ 】 【 【Brow\se today【9;s /tags。环保烟囱

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